Psychology Library e-books drop-in sessions

The Psychology Department Library team are running a drop-in session next week for any questions you might have on using Psychology e-books.

Location: Student Common Room, 1st floor of the department (next door to the Library), Department of Pyschology
Dates: Wednesday 26th November
Times: drop in with your questions anytime 1-2 pm

ebook session November 2014

Having trouble accessing an e-book?

Got a question about searching the e-books collection?

Why not come along and speak to a member of the Department of Psychology’s Library team who will be joined by the ebooks@cambridge team.

If you simply want to know a bit more the team will also be happy to talk to you about e-books in general and why you should consider using them during your studies.

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And, as if finding out about e-books wasn’t good enough already, coffee and doughnuts will be provided.

We look forward to meeting you at the session!

Image credit: ‘Coffee fresh donuts (2012), Hollywood. los Angeles.’ by Noelia Granados on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/e26ivn

Borrow Spanish language e-books from the Digitalia platform

Originally posted on European languages across borders:

A screenshot of the platform.

A screenshot of the platform.

Cambridge University Library has renewed its subscription to DIGITALIA Hispánica for the second year running. DIGITALIA is an aggregator of Spanish-language e-books from Spain, the Caribbean and Latin America. The platform provides access to over 10,700 ebooks and 2,550 ejournal issues, many of them unique to Digitalia. It offers access across multiple file formats, including PDF, HTML Flash, and HTML. See our previous blog post with instructions on access here.

This year, a new feature will allow users to download ebooks using Adobe DRM. To activate this feature, you will need to create a personal account with DIGITALIA. You may do so by clicking on the Your Account tab in the upper right hand corner of the screen. Further instructions are available from the Help Center tab.

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History e-resources drop-in sessions

The Seeley Library team are running two drop-in sessions next week covering all things History e-resources…

Location: Seminar room 7, 2nd Floor, Faculty of History
Dates: Tuesday 18th & Thursday 20th November
Times: drop in with your questions anytime 1-2 pm

electronicresourcesimage

Not sure what are the most important resources for your paper? Want to find an article online but no idea how? Or having trouble accessing an e-book? If you have any questions about e-books, e-journals or any other e-resources bring them along to these informal and friendly drop-in sessions. If you simply want to know a bit more the team will also be happy to talk to you about e-resources in general and why you should consider using them during your studies.

 dropin

New look platform for Elsevier eLibrary

The Elsevier eLibrary hosts 12 popular titles for the school of Clinical Medicine.

eElsevier elibrary

The eLibrary site has been redesigned for easier navigation and functionality across a range of devices. On entering the site you will see your Bookshelf displaying all 12 titles that are available to members of the University of Cambridge (the 15 books that are currently listed include old and new editions of Davidson’s principles and practice of medicine, Macleod’s clinical examination and Robbins & Cotran pathologic basis of disease).

When you read one of the e-textbooks online you will have the option thighlighter elsevierprinter elseviero  print using the printer icon on the right hand side of the screen. On the left hand side of the screen the highlighter icon (‘Text selection’ function) allows you to highlight text on screen (that can be saved to your account if you have one set up) or to copy and paste text.

These e-textbooks are downloadable by clicking ‘Read Offline’ next to each title, you will need to manually download iPublishCentral Reader for PC/Desktop.ipub

When you have downloaded iPublishCentral Reader, or if you already have it installed, you can just click on the green download arrow to add one of the e-textbooks to your bookshelf.

The downloads will be available to you for 7 days.

Elsevier e-textbooks can be accessed and read on PCs, laptops, tablets and smartphones. On iPads both Safari and Chrome web browsers seem to display the titles well.

For further details please see this leaflet published by Elsevier.

 

 

New platform for ebrary ebooks

Searching ebrary has remained the same, but the way in which ebooks are viewed has had a facelift.

From the homepage, you can search or browse by topic. Only titles we own are displayed.

Once you have selected the title you would like to read you will be shown how many pages are available to copy and download. The number of pages will differ per book.

ebrary cover page

When viewing a title in the browser you can highlight and annotate text. That title will then appear when you click on the ‘Bookshelf’ tab, with a list of all the notes you have added. You can sort these titles into folders which can then be exported to EndNote, Citavi or RefWorks. You will need to be logged into Raven to use this functionality.

To download pages as a PDF to keep you will need to click on the image of a printer on the bar above the page view text, this will print your pages to PDF.

You can also download a complete title for 7 or 14 days (depending on the book) using Adobe Digital Editions. In order to download this software click on ‘Download’, you will then be prompted to download Adobe Digital Editions before being able to download the book. Then, next time you click download when in a title it will automatically open using this software. A limited number of titles do not allow downloading in this way.

You can return a downloaded title early in Adobe Digital Editions by right clicking on the book cover. This means a copy is now available for someone else to use.

ebrary functionality If you are visually impaired, ebrary titles can be used with a screen reader. Please contact ebooks@cambridge on ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk for help with this.

Happy Halloween from the ebooks team

Here are a few suggestions of topical ebooks to read on Halloween.3615212504_17a9691fe8_z

 

Image credit: Halloween by Pedro Ferreira on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/6vsUJ5

Searching for ebooks

New to the world of ebooks@cambridge? Here’s a guide to help you start searching.

ebooks@cambridge

Do you need a book for your research right now, but you are not in Cambridge or can’t get to your library? Why not search the ebooks collection at the University of Cambridge and see if you can get hold of an electronic copy to read wherever you are?

It is best to use the search options below as the links we provide in the ebook records are designed to identify you as part of the University of Cambridge.

If you go directly to a publisher’s website or perform an internet search, you may find that you cannot access material for which we have subscriptions, as the website needs the authentication information from the URLs we provide.

There are two ways of searching for ebooks, and they are:

  • LibrarySearch covers all print and electronic holdings of the libraries of the University of Cambridge.
  • ebooks collections list on the ebooks@cambridge webpages.

Click on image to enlarge

LibrarySearch allows you to search the print and electronic collections of all the libraries within the University of Cambridge.

You can refine your search to show ebooks only by clicking on the ebooks icon shown above the search results, or choosing the EBook option under the format heading from the list to the right of the results.

Once you have opened the catalogue record for the book you need you have a choice of two links to use to see full text. The first link is just under the title where it says ‘Online:’, and the second is at the bottom of the record under the heading ‘This is available online at the following:’. The text for the link will vary according to the platform where the ebook is stored. Text will include, but is not limited to:

DawsoneraebookWiley

MyiLibraryEBSCO

The ebook collections  list allows you to browse ebook platforms via authenticated links. You will be prompted to enter your Raven details after clicking on the link and you will be able to search the platform for content available to members of the University.

ebooks collectionsEach entry in the ebook collections list has a brief description of the subjects covered by titles on the platform.

Help wanted

 

For further information on accessing ebooks please see our webpage: Access instructions for ebooks collections

If you would like to contact us directly then please email us at:

ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk

 

 

Image credit: ‘Help Wanted …’ by Matt Wetzler on Flickr - https://flic.kr/p/3QMH8y

 

Translated Texts for Historians e-library

Originally posted on ejournals@cambridge:

New on eresources@cambridge A-Z: Translated Texts for Historians e-library

Liverpool University Press has published its renowned Translated Texts for Historians  book series since the early 1990s.  The series makes available historical sources from 300-800 AD translated into English, in many cases for the first time.

The Translated Texts for Historians e-library now offers this invaluable collection as a digital library, containing 52 volumes from the series that bring together a wealth of important historical texts with scholarship from leading academics.

Access the Translated Texts for Historians e-library via this link.

Image: Drawing of a man, face techniques – Coptic. Plain weave, painting on fabric using fabric dyes (6th – 7th century) [No. 3797; Coptic Museum, Coptic Cairo]

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Commonwealth iLibrary

Originally posted on ejournals@cambridge:

New on the OECD iLibrary platform on trial access: OECD Commonwealth iLibrary.

For the first time books and working papers published by The Commonwealth are now available online in a single research repository.

Trial access is now available until 30 October 2014.

Access the trial via this link.

Please send us your feedback on the repository by emailing ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk

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Loeb Classical Digital Library

Originally posted on ejournals@cambridge:

Cambridge now has trial access to the new Loeb Classical Digital Library, a digitization of the entire Loeb Classical Library’s editions of Greek and Latin literature, complete with their English translations.

“The Loeb Library, with its Greek or Latin on one side of the page and its English on the other, came as a gift of freedom… The existence of the amateur was recognised by the publication of this Library, and to a great extent made respectable… The difficulty of Greek is not sufficiently dwelt upon, chiefly perhaps because the sirens who lure us to these perilous waters are generally scholars [who] have forgotten…what those difficulties are. But for the ordinary amateur they are very real and very great; and we shall do well to recognise the fact and to make up our minds that we shall never be independent of our Loeb.”

—Virginia Woolf, The Times Literary Supplement

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