EBSCO ebook downloading

EBSCO have introduced a new download feature to the University of Cambridge’s owned titles on EBSCOhost.

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Now, when you visit the EBSCOhost website from the ebook collection tab on the ebooks@cambridge webpages or click on a link to an EBSCO title listed in LibrarySearch, you will see an icon on the left hand side of the screen that offers a full text download of our ebooks.

EBSCO downloadThe ebooks can be downloaded for a period of 3 to 7 days. You will be able to choose to download the ebook for fewer days than the total allowed – which will free it them up faster for other people on your course.

One copy of each book will always be available to view online only. The online only copies will be available to view by one person at a time and will not display the download icon.

Do you want to try downloading an EBSCO ebook? Maybe one of these titles will interest you, they were the most used EBSCO ebooks of 2014:

Companion Encyclopedia of AnthropologyProtestant Ethic and the Spirit of CapitalismPsychology of Language

Image credit: ‘Upload/Download’ by John Trainor on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/2SBDZc

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Archaeopress trial

Trial access is now available up to 10th April 2015 to the Archaeopress Archaeology and Seminar for Arabian Studies series from Archaeopress.

Body, cosmos and eternityseminar for Arabian studies (41)Experiencing Etruscan Pots

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology. Archaeopress have had close links to the archaeology departments of the University of Cambridge for many years. There are currently over 75 e-titles in their archive, and around 6-9 new files are added each month.

Please check the Archaeopress title list for titles available to members of the University of Cambridge as part of the trial. As these titles will not appear in LibrarySearch you will need to use this authenticated link to access the trial content.

The origins of Ireland's holy wellsseminar for Arabian studies (36)The British and Vis

Please send any feedback about this trial to ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk.

At Archaeopress, Patrick Harris (patrick@archaeopress.com) would welcome any comments.

 

New Italian-language ebook collections available on Torrossa

Cambridge University Library is pleased to announce that following the purchase last year of three ebooks packages of Italian-language titles on Casalini Libri’s Torrossa ebooks platform, we have this year supplemented these packages and added the 2015 content. The three collections of scholarly titles: Language and Literature, Cinema and Theatre, and Cultural Studies, have had a total of 153 new titles added. In total there are now 266 ebooks available in full-text from the platform link here and they are also searchable in the LibrarySearch catalogue.

Full-text access is available both on and off campus (using a Raven login). This includes the facility to download, print and copy and paste from the text. Torrossa ebooks can be read on PCs, Apple Macs, laptops, iOS and Android mobile devices, but not on Kindles, Kobos or Nooks.

Please do send your feedback on these packages and the usability of these ebooks by emailing Bettina Rex, the Italian Specialist, at the University Library at italian@lib.cam.ac.uk.

fantascienza-italiana_copertinaFranca RameRiccardimontale

New Cambridge Companions available online (& the most popular CC titles in 2014)

New titles are added to the Cambridge Companions Online platform every month, as they are published.

Records for 14 new Companions published since December have just been added to LibrarySearch and they are…

Lighthousefairy tales     modern gothic     roman law

The Top Ten most read Cambridge Companions ebooks consulted by University of Cambridge registered users in 2014 (in order of popularity) were

The Cambridge Companions to

  1. Greek Tragedy
  2. Chaucer
  3. Medieval English Literature 1100-1500
  4. Ovid
  5. Puritanism
  6. Beckett
  7. Milton
  8. Renaissance Humanism
  9. Zola
  10. Spenser

beckett greek tragedy      medieval     humanism