Vietnam under French rule: now available through Cambridge Archive Editions Online

CAE

ebooks@cambridge and the South Asian Studies Library are pleased to announce that members of the University now have online access to the first four volumes of Vietnam under French rule 1919-1946 : the nationalist challenge and the Japanese threat, published by Cambridge Archive Editions and available through East View Information Services. Access is available on and off-campus here and there is a record for the set in iDiscover.

Cambridge Archive Editions Online presents a wealth of historical reference materials from the National Archives which otherwise would remain unknown, difficult to access, or fragmentary. For many years CAE has specialized in the history of the Middle East, Russia and the Balkans, the Caucasus, Southeast Asia, and China and the Far East. Now, through collaboration between Cambridge University Press and East View, these materials are made searchable and accessible with document-level citations and rich indexing.

CAE1The first four volumes of Vietnam under French rule supply some of the key documents which illustrate the sometimes surprising role played by the British government in shaping the territories which were to become Vietnam. By way of illustration, Volume 1 contains an appeal to Britain for the recognition of Annamite claims made at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 by one Nguyen ai Quoc (later known as Ho Chi Minh), which was dismissed by Foreign Office officials as insignificant and unworthy of reply. Yet Volume 4 closes in the early months of 1946, as the British government and British troops stationed in the southern half of a divided Indochina oversaw the evacuation of Japanese troops and facilitated the re-entry of the French.

This purchase was jointly funded by the South Asian Studies Library and ebooks@cambridge. If you have any questions about the resource or platform, please contact either the Librarian at the South Asian Studies Library or ebooks@cambridge.

 

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