History of Cartography

All 3 volumes of History of Cartography is now freely available to view online and download from the University of Chicago‘s website.

8399506431_f76ba3ca60_zThe first volume of the History of Cartography was published in 1987 and the three books that constitute Volume Two appeared over the following eleven years. In 1987 the worldwide web did not exist, and since 1998 book publishing has gone through a revolution in the production and dissemination of work. Although the large format and high quality image reproduction of the printed books (see right column) are still well-suited to the requirements for the publishing of maps, the online availability of material is a boon to scholars and map enthusiasts.

Chapters from the first 6six books can be downloaded as PDFs. Click on the links below to access the ebooks (volume three is in 2 parts, but they have the same cover)

HistCar1HistCar21  histcar22  histcar23    HistCar31part 2

Image credit: ‘District of Adelaide, 1839’ by State Library of South Australia on Flikr – https://flic.kr/p/dNeECp

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ebooks of the day – Battle of Waterloo

As today sees the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo why not read one of our ebooks to learn a little more about it?

Battle of Waterloo 1815Vanity FairFrom Cambridge Books Online we have ‘Vanity Fair : a novel without a hero’ by William Makepeace Thackeray.

This 2013 digital edition includes the illustrations originally published in the 1848 first printing of the novel.

VSI Napoleonic WarsFor an overview of the conflict as a whole Oxford University Press has published ‘The Napoleonic Wars: a very short introduction’.

This book looks at the rise of Napoleon after the French Revolutionary Wars to his final defeat at the Battle of Waterloo.

war‘History of the War in France and Belgium, in 1815’ volumes 1 and 2 is a more detailed study of the war by William Siborne.

Originally published in 1844, these volumes contain descriptions of battles which are based upon the first hand recollections of surviving officers of the British Army, King’s German legion and Hanoverian subsidiary corps.

Image credit: ‘The Battle of Waterloo’ by William Sadler II [public domain], via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ABattle_of_Waterloo_1815.PNG