New ebooks – June 2019

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during June. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

Humanities & Social Sciences

E-Books and E-Legal: What’s the difference?

Some useful advice on the difference between electronic legal deposit books and “normal” ebooks from the SPS Library…

Here at SPS, we’ve recently sent out the Summer Survey (check your emails if you’ve not done it yet, although reminders are on their way) to get feedback on the services we offer here at the Library. Whilst it is still ongoing, we thought we’d have a little peek at the responses we have had so far.

One point that was made more than once related to e-books; the variation between e-book platforms and formats and the restrictions sometimes in place e.g. not being downloadable or only usable by one person at a time. Whilst it is true that some e-book services are less user-friendly than others, we noticed that some comments seemed to be conflating “normal” e-books with the far more specific Electronic Legal Deposit resources that the University Library has access to.

Why can’t I access this online book/journal article?!?

When searching with iDiscover, you may sometimes see…

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New titles available on Routledge Handbooks Online

Thanks to the Connell Fund there are 37 new handbook, international handbook, companion, and history titles available for Cambridge University users on Routledge Handbooks Online. These have all been selected by Faculty and Departmental librarians and they cover the following subjects: Archaeology & Classics, Asian Studies, Built Environment, Communication Journalism Media & Culture, Education, Geography, History, Literature, Philosophy, Politics, Religion, Security Studies, and Sociology. These new titles complement the existing collection on the Routledge Handbooks Online platform and bring the number of available titles up to 539.

All titles are free of Digital Rights Management (DRM) and available in PDF and HTML format. All chapters have an accompanying abstract. The titles are available on and off campus (using a Raven login) and all of them are searchable in iDiscover. You are also able to filter your searches on the platform so that only “full access only” (owned) titles and chapters are displayed.

Complete “clickable” list of new titles:

of interest for Archaeology & Classics

of interest for Asian Studies

of interest for the Built Environment

of interest for Communication, Journalism, Media & Culture

of interest for Education

of interest for Geography

of interest for History

of interest for Literature

of interest for Philosophy

of interest for Politics

of interest for Religion

of interest for Security Studies

of interest for Sociology

New ebooks – April/May 2019

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during April and May. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

Humanities & Social Sciences

Business, Science, Technology and Medicine

Manchester Shakespeare: new ebooks from Manchester University Press

Manchester University Press has launched a new collection not of an age, but for all time. Manchester Shakespeare provides new and significant commentary on all aspects of Shakespeare’s work (and that of his contemporaries), drawing on not only the written word, but Shakespeare in performance, in historical and cultural contexts, and in relation to critical theory.

Including approaching 50 books edited and authored by leading authorities on Shakespeare, the new collection provides critical understanding of Shakespeare’s contribution to literary and theatrical history and fresh perspectives on his plays.

Thanks to a collaborative purchase between the English Faculty Library and ebooks@cambridge, members of Cambridge University now have full text access to all of the ebooks within this collection, on and off-campus, via iDiscover or directly via Manchester Hive, MUPs online platform.

Here is a small selection of titles available within the collection to whet your appetites. Access is via the links below the cover images:

MARC records are available in iDiscover now for the 40+ titles which have already been published in this collection, with a few forthcoming titles/MARC records due later this year.

As usual, please contact ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk if you have any questions about this collection or any other aspect of ebook provision at the University.

ebooks general meeting 2019: focus on accessibility

On April 1st the ebooks@cambridge team held our annual open meeting for Cambridge library staff in the main lecture theatre at St. John’s. The meeting was attended by some forty people from across the Cambridge libraries network, who gathered to hear from a range of speakers representing libraries, students and the Disability Resource Centre on the theme of accessible resource formats, our focus for the session.

The legal and institutional context for accessibility: The Disability Resource Centre

After some networking over coffee and an introduction from Jo Milton, Chair of the ebooks Advisory Group, the meeting began with a presentation by John Harding, Head of the Disability Resource Centre. John provided the legal and institutional context for the meeting by outlining the University’s obligations to make learning resources, including teaching materials, websites, ebooks and ejournals, accessible to people with disabilities. He explained what is happening already within the University and across the HE sector to meet our legal – as well as moral – obligations, and spelled out what actions we need to take, including the action to ensure that students have accessible versions of books, e-books and journals/literature.

The student experience

Next we heard from students. A student with multiple disabilities described some of the many challenges she faces in accessing readings for her course. The amount of time she spends in simply obtaining and converting texts into something she can work with, before even beginning the work of studying from them, was eye-opening. As a user of screen-reading software, ebooks are vital to her studies, and it was gratifying to hear that the work done by the ebooks@cambridge team to obtain accessible formats of reading list titles appears to have been a significant help. Neverthless, there is obviously much work still to be done.

Helen Snelling then read out an email testimonial from a student in the Music Faculty, and regular user of ebooks. She also described the challenges she faces, including chronic pain and reduced mobility, which make trips to the library difficult, and explained that ebooks were ‘a life-line’ to her (although she qualified this by saying that ebooks that are free of Digital Rights Management and don’t restrict downloading are more useful than ‘read online’ ebooks, which are much harder and more time-consuming to put through assistive technologies such as screen readers).

Where we are at with ebooks and accessible formats: news from the ebooks Administrator

Jayne Kelly, the ebooks Administrator, then gave her presentation on the theme of ‘Aspiring to inclusivity’. She reported on the JISC ‘ASPIRE’ project, which, using an open crowd-sourced approach, has audited and ranked ebook platforms according to the quality and availability of the guidance they publish regarding their accessibility (spoiler alert: EBSCO ebooks hit the top spot for aggregators). Jayne then went on to outline the dilemma faced by the ebooks team when selecting ebook models for purchase: best price often equals less accessibility. Buying more accessible ebooks appears to mean that fewer titles can be afforded. On the other hand, purchasing more accessible ebooks could present opportunities to save money across the University, for example on scanning costs and staff time converting print materials. Jayne finished her talk by explaining what makes an ebook more or less accessible and talking through what is involved in obtaining accessible formats from publishers and services such as RNIB Bookshare.

Futurelib update – Developing the accessibility and inclusivity of Cambridge library services – and some discussion

Finally, David Marshall talked about Futurelib’s current project to explore the needs of disabled students at Cambridge through deep, qualitative research. He shared some quotes from participants, giving us further insight into the experiences of disabled students, and outlined some of the forthcoming outputs of the study, including a prototype Accessibility and inclusivity toolkit for Cambridge libraries. The meeting then wrapped up with some stimulating group discussion around our experiences in providing accessible/alternate format resources for library users and our ideas for a perfect accessible resource provision service at Cambridge.

The meeting was well received by participants – we have received some very positive feedback. The decision to focus on such a hot topic and bring in speakers from outside the library world was welcomed.

Cambridge librarians can access the slides for these presentations on the Cambridge Libraries Intranet. Please contact ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk if you have any questions about the meeting, or would like further information about ebooks and accessibility.

New ebooks – March 2019

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during March. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

Humanities & Social Sciences

Science, Technology and Medicine

Cambridge Elements; “a dynamic reference resource for graduate students, researchers and practitioners”

Back in May 2018 the ebooks@cambridge team first posted about the then newly emerging Cambridge University Press Elements titles. This publishing programme has now officially launched and the amount of available titles are steadily increasing, with 76 Elements now hosted and accessible on Cambridge Core and searchable in iDiscover.

Cambridge Elements are a new concept in academic publishing and scholarly communication, combining the best features of books and journals. They consist of original, concise, authoritative, and peer-reviewed scholarly and scientific research, organised into focused series edited by leading scholars, and provide comprehensive coverage of the key topics in disciplines spanning the arts and sciences. This innovative format takes just 12 weeks to publish, and the born-digital titles are between 40-75 pages long. There are over 70 series already under contract, with another 30 in the planning stages. Two hundred titles are expected to be published in 2019, and CUP expect to standardly publish in the region of 250 titles per year.

Elements are organised in series within the following subjects.

All of these Elements titles in all of the series will be available for University of Cambridge registered students and staff. Catalogue records for newly published Elements will be added to iDiscover on a monthly basis, alongside the monograph and coursebook title records.

Click on the book covers below to connect to a selection of Elements titles on Cambridge Core. Please note: some of these titles are “coming soon” and some Elements are published Open Access.

              

 scenario

If you have queries about any of the Elements titles please contact the ebooks@cambridge team at ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk.

New ebooks – February 2019

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during February. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

Humanities & Social Sciences

Business & Management

Sciences

Celebrate LGBT History Month with ebooks@cambridge

rosesIn celebration of LGBT History Month, the ebooks@cambridge team shines a light on a selection of LGBT titles that are available within two of our ebook collections.

Demand-driven purchases on Ebook Central

The first group of titles are all part of our Demand-Driven Acquisition scheme with Ebook Central. In this scheme, catalogue records for a large number of ebooks meeting specific selection criteria are added to iDiscover. The books are fully accessible to users and are triggered for purchase (and therefore become a permanent part of the ebook collection) when used for longer than ten minutes or when a selection is printed. The following titles were all triggered for purchase during the academic year 2018-19. Click on the covers to access the ebooks:

Histories of the transgender child  Welcome to Fairyland  Retroactivism in the lesbian archives  Boys in the band  Gender and sexualities in Africa  Boys love

Duke University Press

Duke University Press is known for publishing field-defining scholarship in queer theory, gay and lesbian studies and transgender studies. The University Library has purchased permanent ebook access to all 2016 – 2018 titles on Duke University Press’s own platform, and currently has access to all backlist titles too. Here are some of the LGBTQ+ titles from the 2018 collection (again, click on the covers to access the books):

Mobile subjects  Desire work  My butch career  Gay priori  Fugitive life  Erotic islands  Sisters in the life  Seeking rights

All of the above titles in both collections are available to members of the University on and off-campus through iDiscover or via the links on this page. Off-campus access requires a Raven username and password.

As usual, please contact ebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk with any questions about these or other ebooks in our collection.